Saturday, December 22, 2018

360 Vegas POV: Casino E-5




In this installment, we continue our analysis of Martin Scorsese's movie Casino by analyzing the view from Ace's Penthouse at night

Saturday, December 15, 2018

E-287: Litter of Pigs



Random Vegas

After Harrah's Entertainment purchased the Binion's Horseshoe brand so they could get the rights to the World Series of Poker brand, part of the assists included in that acquisition was the Horseshoe Hotel and Casino that existed in Shreveport Louisiana.  However, Harrah's already owned 2 casinos in the market.  So to avoid a monopoly, the Louisiana Gaming Commission required them to sell one of the properties.  So Boyd Gaming bought in and that's how Shreveport got a Sam's Town

Twitpic of the week 


I love history so much, especially documented history of Las Vegas, shared this week by @SummaCorp.  To illustrate how singularly focused I can be when it comes to the subject, the first thing I noticed when I looked at this picture was the Fremont hotel & casino under construction.  Once I was done marveling at that, I turned to the rest of the photograph and thought, “Okay, can we dial it back with the holiday decorations Vegas?  It’s a bit too busy for my taste.  And it’s getting the way of my ability to see all the neon signage on display.”  Then I’m reminded about another thing I love about Las Vegas “This isn’t all about you MARK”.  Then a sense of all-is-right-with-the-world washes over me. “You’re right Las Vegas, this is much bigger than me.  I recant my statements.  Please, carry on spreading happiness to all in whatever fashion they find appealing.  And also, I love you.” 

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Saturday, December 8, 2018

E-286: Caviar on a Pop Tart


Random Vegas 
The S’s in the Sassy Sally signage are actually dollar signs meant to be a subliminal message to people to encourage them to spend more money as well as insinuate you can win more money at the property (Neon Museum) 

Twitpic of the week 


I’ll go ahead and say it, Steve Wynn ruined the Fremont St skyline when he replaced Golden Nugget’s exterior with the more elegant version it’s known as having today.  Look at this week’s winner, shared by @Summacorp, and tell me I’m wrong.  That glorious golden yellow set against an ever-changing backdrop of warm browns and cool purplish blues is the best the Golden Nugget has ever looked.  If time travel is ever something I’m able to figure out, one of the things I’ll do is going back to this moment and invest extensive amounts of time looking at this version of the Golden Nugget with unnerving adoration.  That is if I'm able to take my eyes off the #1 thing I’d do, leering at the Mint.  Alas that discovery is ever elusive so I’ll have to enjoy documentation such as what I had the pleasure to do this week. 

News

Plaza Equestrian Center Opens
Terrible Herbst’s founder Dies at 80
Michael Symon Experiment part 2
Bond Barbershop Coming

Saturday, December 1, 2018

E-285: Short Spurts



Random Vegas 
The green fees for the Wynn Golf course were $500 per golfer meaning the resort would only need 80 golfers to average the $40k per day (@MattLawson123) 

Twitpic of the week 


Here’s what I love about this week’s winner shared by @TonyIlliait looks like Americana.  This could be any random thoroughfare periodically found along route 66 that died with the advent of the highway system.  At first it isn’t even obvious that it’s Las Vegas until you spot the iconic Sands marquee at the side of the road.  But after that, while we know since this picture was taken in 1963, in the distance the Desert Inn, Last Frontier, Thunderbird, Stardust, Riviera and Sahara are all open.  At this moment in time, they fade into the backdrop of black and white desert landscape.  Something else you can’t see is what was on the horizon, because it’s out of frame.  Sitting just to the right and only 80% complete, the Landmark, the tallest structure in the city signaled the future of Las Vegas was larger than life.  Bigger was not only better, it would be required to attract guests to your property.  The Landmark’s very existence inspired the unmistakable additions of Howard Hughes future residence at the Desert Inn, the St. Andrews Tower, the iconic Stardust marquee and the 500-room cylindrical hotel tower at the Sands to the Vegas skyline before it was finished in 1969. 

Saturday, November 17, 2018

E-284: The Password is...


Random Vegas

It's a popular myth that the scene in the movie Casino where Joe Pesci's character stabbed a guy in the neck after saying something smart ass to Robert De Niro's character was not only filmed at Atomic Liquors, that's where it actually happened.  Neither happened at Atomic Liquors (My eyes and the Atomic Liquor bartender) 
Twitpic of the week

It's a feeling of euphoria and concern.  A dreamlike state brought to you by @arivetinglifewhere one can't help but think, "Life doesn't get any better than moments like this."  Interrupted by a moment of realization that very soon you'll not recall what's happening around you so you should probably get back to your room. Just before it occurs to you that you're not exactly sure how you got here in the first place.  Polished off with acceptance that if this is the way you die, you'd be okay with that but this better not be a dream where you're living out scenes from the movie Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.  No one should be forced to endure the movie equivalent of waterboarding let alone a subconscious version you can't simply walk away from.
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Saturday, November 10, 2018

360 Vintage Vegas: Howard Hughes (PCP)






Patreon.com/360Vegas

Howard Hughes
It’s a shame that the last 10 years of his life largely overshadows all he accomplished prior to his decent into madness.  Truth be told, Howard Hughes was a genius; an innovator in business, aviation, film and in his lifetime, was one of the most financially successful people in the world.  His work ethic was legendary as was his disregard for his own safety, especially when it came to his first true love, flying.  That disregard would eventually cause him to be involved in the plane crash of an experimental aircraft that almost killed him.  While he did eventually recover, he would never be the same. In chronic pain for the rest of his life, his over medication to address the issue pushed his struggles with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder into stratospheric levels, causing him to become the eccentric recluse most remember him for.  Despite all that, what Hughes did during his time in Las Vegas helped the market evolve from the seedy place run by mobsters to a respectable industry; even if that wasn’t his intention and resulted purely because it was his name attached to the legendary great acquisition of Las Vegas

Whatever you think you know about Howard Hughes, he was undeniably a genius by any definition of the word.  The Hughes family made their millions by creating a drill bit that dramatically improved the way oil was drilled for.  At the age of 19, after his father's death, Howard took over ToolCo and used his family’s wealth to revolutionize multiple industries.  With RKO Studios, he changed the way movies were made, introducing violence and sex to the cinema.  He was one of the leading innovators in aviation, setting multiple world records. That knowledge was so valued, Hughes Aircraft become one of the US government’s largest private contractors for military planes, and his commercial airline TWA was a leader in the evolution of commercial flight.  Sadly it was his refusal to be confined by the metaphorical walls he was told he had to operate within, in whatever he decided we wanted to do, that ended up causing him to be confined by the actual walls he would spent last 20 years of his life in, seclude from the world.  And even in those constraints, he was able to change, not only another industry but the reputation of an entire state, all while in constant pain, terrified of just about everything imaginable outside of that room on the 9thfloor of the Desert Inn.  Even if what he accomplished was nothing more than a symbolic shift in the gaming industry, Howard Hughes will forever be known as one of the most important people involved in the evolution of Las Vegas.

Saturday, November 3, 2018

E-283: Et Tu Brute?



Random Vegas
In 2003, new owners MGM Mirage announced plans to move away from the family friendly concept at Treasure Island in favor of something more traditionally Vegas. The property rebranded itself “TI”, removed the skull and crossbones marquee and replaced it with a digital “TI” sign and replaced the pirate show with a sexed-up theme called the “Sirens of TI”

Twitpic of the week

This week's winner, brought to you by @BSKphoto, is one of the best aerial photos of the strip I've ever seen. In addition to its neon glory, it evokes hope in the wake of last week's grim assessment that the forewarned damage unimaginative additions to the market and the adaptation of nickel and dime fees would do to Vegas has come to fruition.  This photo reminds that we created this city. We agreed to the house advantage in exchange for a fair shot and an unforgettable experience.  And now it falls to us to point out which party is in breach of contract and support those that still honor our original deal. A few times in human history, people have the opportunity to effect real change and rage against the machine.  Now is one of those times and you only need to be brave enough to try and save the city you love with the most powerful weapon imaginable in a capitalist economy, your money.  Years of complaining about it on social media has not encouraged legislation to stop Resort Fees or discourage Vegas properties from continuing to charge and increase them year over year.  But 6 months of declining revenues has delivered the punch to the face ownership had coming to them.  It has struck fear in the heartless and mocked the outdated Gordon Gecko philosophy that greed is good.  Unfortunately a shock and awe attack will not win us this war.  It will require a prolonged effort that, if we're lucky, will have casualties in casino leadership.  And from those ashes the opportunity to discover the next visionary leaders needed to restore Las Vegas to it's former glory, lest we be required to claim another inept Caesar until that leadership is revealed to us.

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Saturday, October 27, 2018

E-282: O'Sphere Irish Bar



Random Vegas 
Gary Loveman was the perfect fit for CEO in the Harrah’s business model, offering a quality experience at a reasonable price.  Despite the wealth he acquired from his various business successes, Gary and his family didn’t live like millionaires.  True, they did have a vacation home on the beach in North Carolina and at one point Loveman did have a Ferrari but he ended up selling it because he said it wasn’t practical.  Not wanting the invasion of privacy, the Loveman family even elected to clean their own home ever Saturday rather than hire a housekeeper.  It was reported that one of the weekly choirs the CEO of Harrah’s had was to clean the toilets.  (Jackpot - Harrah's Winning Secrets to Customer Loyalty) 

Twitpic of the week 


Creedence Clearwater Revival.  3 words I would have never thought would find their way into a Twitpic of the week monolog.  But every time I look at this week's winner from @vegasphotographthe phrase "I see a bad moon rising" comes to mind.  Not just because it features a brilliant oversized moon hovering over a collection of properties but because it's a fitting metaphor for what's happening to the market and the danger it finds itself in.  Unlike any time before in Vegas history, the market is experiencing a slump that has nothing to do with the economy, it's the current experience available at fault in this case.  Resort fees, Pay for Parking, CNF charges and the likes have taken the record breaking attendance the city has seen over the last few years and given all those first time visitors an experience that won't encourage them to return.  

When Vegas was growing up, even the mafia understood the most important thing to establish with the customer is that the game is fair.  The house already has the advantage so there is no reason to build in scams to cheat the customer out of their money.  That philosophy developed trust that has lasted over a millennia and made Las Vegas the #1 tourist destination in the world.  Today, that trust has been broken and the market has lost its integrity.  Visitors now need to keep a vigilant eye out for the metaphorical shell game that does exists around every corner.  You're room doesn't cost what it was advertised to costyour meal is more expensive than the price of your food and the things that made Vegas different from every other place on the planet are falling away one by one.  Uninspired industry leadership like Jim Murren are succeeding in turning the Las Vegas experience into one that can be had in every other major city in America.  And with gambling becoming legal across the country, if the Vegas experience is no different than the one available back home, why go.  There was a time when people would ask me what they needed to do during their first visit to Las Vegas.  That response used to always start with "There's so much to do it just depends on the experience you want to have".  Today, it begins with "Beware." 

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