Saturday, July 13, 2019

E-306: Cream of Nut Spread



Random Vegas

The Golden Nugget opened on Fremont St in 1946.  The signage best known for its appearance in the James Bond film Diamonds are Forever as well as the signage on display when Steve Wynn initially took over the property in 1973, featured a glittering nugget of gold with the date 1905 above it.  That date is the year the city of Las Vegas was born.  Specifically, May 15th, 190, coincidentally, the same date as my birthday.  (Neon Museum) 

Twitpic of the week



Look at those cars.  Look at those colors.  @TonyIllia’s picture this week seems to capture downtown Las Vegas like a fuckin oil painting, exaggerating the reality of the time.  But it isn’t an exaggeration.  This is a fuckin picture, simply capturing the awe-inspiring site that was downtown Las Vegas in the late 1950s.  I find it apropos that this photo was shared at this time while we continue work on our next large scale 360 Vintage Vegas project, the evolution of Fremont St. Not only that, it features the Nevada Club, the one first casinos on Fremont to absorb its next-door neighbor so it could expand its footprint, merging 113 and 117 Fremont St.

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Saturday, July 6, 2019

E-305: The Face



Random Vegas
Average Las Vegas casino electricity bill is about $100,000/month. Big casinos are much more. For example, MGM Grand averages $350,000/month. (VitalVegas)

Twitpic of the week

I never liked the Frontier.  I didn’t like the theme, thought the place was gross and was indifferent to the signage.  I understood why other people liked it because I kind of liked O’Shea’s and it was a shithole.  But honestly, I was happy to see it go.  Then perspective set in while I continue to try and learn everything I can about the city that changed my life.  And even though the Frontier was nothing more than an attempt to copy the El Rancho but make it better in every way, the fact is…they accomplished it.  Think about it, Walt Disney didn’t invent amusement parks, he just found a way to do it better than everyone else.  Also, this show was created in the same vain.  In 2011, when I was just a fan of Las Vegas like all of you listening and looking for podcasts to listen to about it, I couldn’t help but think of all the things I wish the shows I enjoyed would do.  Not being the kind of person to tell someone else how they should produce their creative outlet, that desire for more evolved into the 360 Vegas Podcast.  All that said, it still doesn’t change my feelings about the Frontier, but now I respect it and it’s place in the city’s history.  Thank you @classiclasvegas for helping to guide that revelation

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