Saturday, November 9, 2019

E-318: Casinary

Random Vegas 
Another key moment in my life may be the moment I realized one of my favorite neon signs in Las Vegas history, a sign I accepted I would never be able to see with my own eyes, was NOT lost to the world.  And not only does it still exist, it’s been hidden in plain sight, in classic Vegas fashion.  The iconic, original Mint hotel marquee, with the swooping arch and cascading lights soaring 10 stories tall, is right where you remember it.  Except you’ve not been able to see it, because Binion’s built its signage over top of the Mint’s after purchasing the property in 1988 and expanding into the space.  Binion’s Whiskey Liquor Up project required the removal of the properties south west signage to accommodate.  So much in fact, it exposed that the former stone fa├žade and the legendary 1959 Mint signage still exists. Today, Whiskey Liquor Up celebrates their history, and the history of Fremont, by featuring this revealed section of the Mint signage along the staircase, that takes you up to the bar/restaurant. 


Twitpic of the week 


What can you say about aerial photographs of the strip that hasn’t already been said before?  Let’s see.  These shots always overwhelm me, sincerely.  It’s almost like I’m awed by the shear scope of the whole thing.  It makes you wonder if Vegas is too big to fail, setting aside that, that phrase is most commonly affiliated with the Titanic.  What I mean is, is all the gripping we do about the people running things valueless because Vegas can’t be stopped?  Is Vegas a microcosm of our planet with a built-in self-defense mode programmed to shake humans off like a bad case of fleas if we actually become a real threat, or is it a monument to human decadence that we will one day look back on and learn from the mistakes made.  Or maybe it’s just views like this, shared by @maverickheli that puts the city in an idealic state, somehow impervious to the politics below.  Either way, well done humans on the invention of the helicopter and photography. 

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Saturday, October 19, 2019

E-317: One of those two statements is correct

Random Vegas
The signs you see in the center of Fremont East, the martini glass, Las Vegas Oldsmobile logo and the Silver Slipper are NOT restored signs.  That are all “inspired” by Vegas signs of yesteryear…and Silver Slipper is just a rip off of the restored sign out front of the Neon Museum.  They are originals created for Fremont East, installed in 2007 (vital Vegas)

Twitpic of the week



There is something to be said about signage so large, like the 65 Thunderbird frontage shared by @_GrandPaD, it reminds one just how small we all are in the grand scheme of things.  Typically, massive signage is displayed at elevated heights, but when hotel casinos were really motel casinos, resorts simply weren’t as tall as they are today.  Taking inspiration from its neighbor across the street, the Stardust.  in May of 1965, the Thunderbird began renovating its exterior frontage into a 700-foot-long sign, the biggest sign in Vegas history at the time, 3 feet longer Stardust and featuring 12-foot-high letters.  However, the new signage came at the expense of the room views in the south wing because the sign was placed directly in front of the guest room windows; replacing a view of the strip with one of circuit boards, 20 miles of electric wire and the buzz of 15,000 volts per tube.  To address complaints, management installed blackout curtains.

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